How to help your loved one after returning home from the hospital

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

If your loved one has been ill or injured and has spent significant time in the hospital, it can be a difficult thing to return home and get back into the swing of things. There are several ways you can help out, but we've listed a few here, just to get you started.
1. Offer to bring them home. The first struggle is getting home. Depending on their illness or medication, they may not be able to drive, so giving them a lift is just one less thing they have to worry about.

How to Prevent Illness by Reducing Stress

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

It's a scientific fact that stress can exacerbate existing illnesses or even cause new illness. This is because stress causes the body to pump out hormones. These hormones can be good in small doses - they can help us get through a particularly stressful situation, but when stress is elevated for an extended period of time, this overflow of hormones can actually cause us to get sick by weakening the immune system.* Dr.

How to Care for a Caregiver

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

In today's world of modern medical science, people are living longer than ever. While this is a great achievement, it has also created a generation of caregivers and, while elderly folks may be living longer, they aren't necessarily living longer by themselves. They often need help inside their homes or in assisted living facilities.

Why does food make us feel better?

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

Why is it that when we are feeling down and out, food is often the only thing that can make us feel better? There are several reasons, some of which relate to sensory memory, but there are also real biological reasons that food - regardless of its healthfulness - actually makes us feel physically better.

Dividing Caregiving Duties

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

If you've ever taken care of a sick or elderly loved one, then you know how overwhelming the task of caregiving can be. For those who are long-term caregivers, burnout is a serious issue. So how can you avoid caregiver burnout if you are a caregiver, or how can you help someone you know who is a caregiver? There are several ways, some are small, others are large, but some effort should be taken to help distribute the weight.

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

January is cervical health and cervical cancer awareness month and, at Get Well Meal, we'd like to share some important information about preventing and treating cervical cancer. More than 12,000 women in the US are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year, and more than 4,000 women will die from the disease annually. Cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer in women.

Ways to Celebrate Your Remission

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

Remission. It's a word so many people with serious illnesses long for. It's something you strived for and looked towards as a light at the end of your disease and treatment tunnel.
If you've achieved remission, you know the happiness and the cause for celebration it brings with it. Embrace that feeling and on the next anniversary of your remission - do something special. Because if your illness has taught you anything it's to enjoy life and to celebrate the small and the big things.
Here are a few idea on how to mark this momentous occasion:

February is American Heart Month

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

This year marks the 50th anniversary of American Heart Month from the American Heart Association. More than 787,000 people in the U.S. died from heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases in 2010. That's about one of every three deaths in America. In fact, cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer combined. What's even more heartbreaking about those statistics is that heart disease is preventable in many cases.

How to Cheer up a Sick Friend with SAD

  • Posted on: 5 August 2015
  • By: rachelburns

SAD or Seasonal Affective Disorder affects four to six percent of people severely and another 10 to 20 percent more moderately. Seasonal Affective Disorder is a type of depression that is season specific, and generally affects people in the winter, when the days are shorter and colder. If you've ever experienced SAD, then you know how difficult it can be to get through the doldrum days of winter, but imagine dealing with SAD when you're already sick.

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